What muscles do underhand rows work?

What muscles do reverse grip rows work?

A reverse-grip row hits your lats toward the center of your body and the lower section of your traps while also recruiting your rhomboids and biceps.

Which grip is best for back?

Pull downs, pull ups and back rows with an overhand grip will work the lats, or latissimus dorsi, while a narrow underhand grip will further involve the biceps. A dumbbell row with a neutral grip focuses on the rhomboids and trapezius muscles of your upper back.

Which row is best for back?

Bent-Over Barbell Row

The bent-over barbell row is the best back movement in terms of sheer weight a person can lift. It equally works the larger muscle groups of the lower and upper back, making this exercise a great overall back builder.

Is underhand or overhand better for rows?

Overhand barbell rows tend to naturally bow a persons elbows out and make for more muscle activation in the upper back, rhomboids, and traps. Underhand rows work more of the lats. … If you lack wrist flexibility it will lead to the elbows flaring, which can then lead to a greater risk of injury in the elbow and shoulder.

Does grip matter for Bent over row?

Your grip should just be slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. The bent-over position can potentially cause a little discomfort or even risk of injury, so it’s important to use proper form. The form is also extremely important with bent-over dumbbell rows, so it’s vital you choose the right amount of weight.

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What type of row is best?

Key Takeaways. The bent-over row is one of the single best exercises for building a wide, thick, defined back and strong, defined arms. The conventional bent-over barbell row is the most popular kind of bent-over row, but the dumbbell bent-over row, Yates row, and standing T-bar bent-over are worthy alternatives.

Are barbell rows worth it?

The barbell row is a fundamental exercise that will pack serious meat onto your back — and it does more than that, too. It also helps bulletproof your shoulders, building the back muscle needed to prevent your shoulders from rolling forward when you stand up, a common issue for lifters who bench press often.