Question: What back muscles are used when performing bent over rows?

What muscles does bent-over row work?

What muscles do bent-over rows work?

  • Latissumus dorsi (run down the sides of your back)
  • Rhomboids (upper and mid-back)
  • Trapezius (upper back)
  • Biceps.

What muscles are used in bent-over dumbbell rows?

The bent-over dumbbell row is a great exercise—when done with proper form. It improves your posture, stabilizes your core, and sculpts your upper, mid, and lower back. In particular, you’ll work your latissimus (aka lats), trapezius, rhomboids, and erector spinae, along with your biceps. Yeah, that’s a lot.

Are Bent-over rows good for your back?

The Barbell Row, or Barbell Bent-Over Row, is a strength exercise that works the back muscles. It’s a challenging lift to perform, but it’s one of the most effective exercises for building back strength and size if done correctly.

How many bent-over rows should I do?

Because it lends itself to training heavy, the bent-over barbell row is usually performed for sets of 6 to 12 reps, but it can be done for higher rep ranges to train the endurance of the lower back and core.

Which grip is best for bent-over row?

When performing bent-over rows you can either have your hands in a pronated (palms facing down) or supinated (palms facing up) position. A supinated grip will incorporate more of your biceps into the movement, meaning you can hold the bar at a narrower angle — and lift slightly heavier.

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Do bent-over rows work shoulders?

The bent over row is a multi-jointed exercise that recruits several different muscles. It improves strength in the upper and lower back, glutes, hamstrings, lats, and shoulders.

Do rows work arms?

The dumbbell row, also known as the bent-over dumbbell row, is a compound back exercise. … Like other rowing exercises, the dumbbell row uses a pulling movement pattern that activates multiple muscles in your upper back, shoulders, core, and arms.

Why are bent over rows bad?

This is bad. With a majority of the movement generated from joints and non-contractile structures, the poorly positioned bent-over row not only steals the muscular emphasis we’re targeting, but places the body in a potentially injurious position.