Is white water rafting dangerous?

What are the chances of dying white water rafting?

Whitewater rafting and kayaking are exciting sports that are currently undergoing phenomenal growth. Although risk is inherent in all ”adventure” sports, the fatality risk of whitewater boating (29 per million kayaking days, 5.5–8.7 per million rafting days) is on par with other ”adventure” sports (Table 2).

Is white water rafting scary?

Whitewater rafting can be scary to some. Frightening, daunting, or terrifying even. … But after so many whitewater rafting trips, the fear quickly turns into thrill and excitement.

Has anyone died whitewater rafting?

The American Whitewater organization has counted 12 fatalities and an injury on Colorado waterways this year while The Colorado Sun has counted 13 fatalities. Either way, it’s far above the annual toll of 8 deaths on Colorado waterways each year since 2009 and the most since 12 lost their lives in 2016.

Is swimming necessary for rafting?

Swimming ability is always recommended, but not required to go rafting on rivers such as the South Fork of the American river (unless we are in a High water situation where the river level is quite a bit higher than normal). … Most river rafting companies will not take non-swimmers on these types of trips.

Do you get wet while white water rafting?

The biggest question guests have before rafting for the first time is what to wear white water rafting. When on your white water rafting Gatlinburg trip, make sure you wear clothes you don’t mind getting wet or dirty. You will be getting wet, and it is also possible for you to get a little dirty as well.

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Are Class 4 rapids dangerous?

Class IV: Advanced

Intense, powerful but predictable rapids requiring precise boat handling in turbulent water. … Rapids may require “must” moves above dangerous hazards. Scouting may be necessary the first time down. Risk of injury to swimmers is moderate to high, and water conditions may make self-rescue difficult.